Dataset of Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Coleoptera from Sierra Nevada

Sampling event
Latest version published by Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory. Andalusian Environmental Center, University of Granada, Regional Government of Andalusia on Jan 16, 2024 Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory. Andalusian Environmental Center, University of Granada, Regional Government of Andalusia

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 1,718 records in English (415 KB) - Update frequency: annually
Metadata as an EML file download in English (50 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (31 KB)

Description

This dataset collects the available information on abundances of stoneflies, caddisflies and aquatic beetles present in the streams and rivers of the Sierra Nevada (southern Spain) from different sources. Data include the location of the sampling sites where these insects were recorded, the available abiotic characteristics of their habitats and information on the number of individuals, the life stage in which they were collected and, for adults, their sex. All data coming from reaches belonging to streams and rivers above 800 m of altitude have been considered (not including records of these insects from high mountain lakes or other lentic habitats). The dataset is composed of 1,718 sampling events carried out between 1905 and 2022 in approximately 60 different water bodies, 15,347 occurrences belonging to more than 203,000 individuals, and 10,173 records of associated measurements (23 physico-chemical parameters). The dataset is the result of a comprehensive review of scientific literature and of integrating the Smart EcoMountains project data and the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory’s long-term monitoring data. This information will be valuable for those studying past distributions and abundances of the species present in the dataset, as a basis for building predictive models or just studying temporal trends.

Data Records

The data in this sampling event resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 1,718 records.

2 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

Event (core)
1718
Occurrence 
15347
MeasurementOrFacts 
10173

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

López Rodríguez M J, Fajardo Merlo M D C, Tierno de Figueroa J M, Sainz-Cantero C E, Sainz Bariáin M (2024). Dataset of Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Coleoptera from Sierra Nevada. Version 1.5. Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory. Andalusian Environmental Center, University of Granada, Regional Government of Andalusia. Samplingevent dataset. https://doi.org/10.15470/wqbmkz

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory. Andalusian Environmental Center, University of Granada, Regional Government of Andalusia. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY 4.0) License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: d06b3c45-0d91-46e8-9732-a3ebecd659f7.  Sierra Nevada Global Change Observatory. Andalusian Environmental Center, University of Granada, Regional Government of Andalusia publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by GBIF Spain.

Keywords

Samplingevent; stoneflies; caddisflies; aquatic beetles; abundance; nymphs; larvae; adults; streams; rivers; Sierra Nevada; southern Iberian Peninsula; Spain

Contacts

Manuel Jesús López Rodríguez
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Associate Professor
University of Granada
Avenida de la Fuente Nueva S/N
18071 Granada
Granada
+34958249767
María del Carmen Fajardo Merlo
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Technician
Agencia de Medio Ambiente y Agua. Department of Sustainability, Environment and Blue Economy. Regional Government of Andalusia
C/ Minerva 7. Edificio Zeus III, local
18014 Granada
Granada
ES
+34649064168
José Manuel Tierno de Figueroa
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Professor
University of Granada
Avenida de la Fuente Nueva S/N
18071 Granada
Granada
ES
+34958241000 ext. 20099
Carmen Elisa Sainz-Cantero
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Associate Professor
University of Granada
Avenida de la Fuente Nueva S/N
18071 Granada
Granada
ES
+34958243239
Marta Sainz Bariáin
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Researcher M2
Spanish Institute of Oceanography, Spanish National Research Council, IEO-CSIC
Avenida de Severiano Ballesteros 16
39004 Santander
Cantabria
ES
+34942291716
Andrea Ros Candeira
  • Point Of Contact
Research Assistant
Laboratory of Ecology, Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA-CEAMA), University of Granada
Avenida del Mediterráneo s/n
18006 Granada
Granada
ES
+34958249748

Geographic Coverage

Sierra Nevada is a mountain system located in the South of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain), shared by the provinces of Granada and Almería, and with an East-West arrangement. It covers 2,273 km2 and reaches a maximum altitude of 3,479 m a.s.l. in the Mulhacén summit. Due to its meridional situation in Europe, its proximity to the Mediterranean Sea and its high altitude, it represents a high gradient of climatic conditions, with representation of five out of six of the bioclimatic zones present in the Mediterranean region (from the thermo-mediterranean to the crioro-mediterranean). The Sierra Nevada Natural Area has an extensive hydrographic network made up of rivers and streams (as well as high mountain lakes), which are fed mainly by snow from the high peaks. It is worth highlighting the great diversity of ecotypes present, with an important representation of fluvial courses typified as high mountain rivers, Siliceous Mediterranean mountain rivers, Calcareous Mediterranean mountain rivers and mineralised Mediterranean low mountain rivers. This variety of ecotypes promote the existence of a great biodiversity.

Bounding Coordinates South West [36.93, -3.6], North East [37.276, -2.803]

Taxonomic Coverage

This dataset includes a total of 15,347 occurrence records (exceeding 203,000 individuals) of the Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Coleoptera orders. There are 30 families, 70 genera, 121 species and 12 subspecies represented in this dataset.

Order Plecoptera, Trichoptera, Coleoptera

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 1905-03-15 / 2022-12-21

Project Data

1) The Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory (https://obsnev.es/) is an ambitious project promoted by the Department of Sustainability, Environment and Blue Economy of the Regional Government of Andalusia with the scientific coordination of the University of Granada, in order to monitor the effects of global change in the Sierra Nevada protected area. For this purpose, the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory has developed a monitoring programme and an information system for appropriate data management. As part of this programme, monitoring methodologies were defined to long-term monitor aquatic macroinvertebrates and physico-chemical and flow parameters. Fluvial ecosystems receive many types of pressure and impact and therefore constitute one of the most vulnerable environments against possible adverse effects of global change. Therefore, both the increase in environmental temperature as well as significant changes in the water cycles can have immediate repercussions on continental aquatic ecosystems. Temperature determines biological processes and thus marked changes in temperature can affect the metabolism, growth, reproduction, emergence, and distribution of a multitude of aquatic organisms. 2) Smart EcoMountains (University of Granada-Sierra Nevada, Spain) is the Thematic Center on Mountain Ecosystems of the European Research Infrastructure LifeWatch-ERIC (https://smartecomountains.lifewatch.eu/). The main objective of the project is the long-term evaluation of mountain ecosystems' functions and services in the context of global change, using remote sensing, computing and new information and communication technologies advanced tools. The Smart EcoMountains project pursues three main objectives: 1- generate information on biodiversity, ecosystem services and global change in mountain ecosystems; 2- develop new technological tools and services that facilitate the exchange, localisation, access and analysis of data by scientists, in order to improve our knowledge of mountain ecosystems and the main global change processes affecting them; 3- develop tools to inform society about the most important global change processes affecting mountain biodiversity and ecosystem services, and support environmental managers and policymakers in science-based decision making. Within this project and the Work Package 2 "Monitoring of watersheds", an intensive monitoring of the Poqueira river has been carried out during a whole year, in which data on physicochemical parameters, chlorophyll-a and the macroinvertebrate community have been collected. Parallelly, the other data present in this dataset (except those from the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory) have been compiled from an exhaustive review of the available bibliography, and new, non-published, data have also been added.

Title 1) Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory 2) Smart EcoMountains: Thematic Center on Mountain Ecosystem & Remote sensing, Deep learning-AI e-Services University of Granada-Sierra Nevada
Identifier 1) OBSNEV 2) LIFEWATCH-2019-10-UGR-4
Funding This work was conducted under the agreement “Convenio de colaboración entre la Consejería de Sostenibilidad, Medio Ambiente y Economía Azul de la Junta de Andalucía y la Universidad de Granada para el desarrollo de actividades vinculadas al Observatorio de Cambio Global de Sierra Nevada, en el marco de la Red de Observatorios de Cambio Global de Andalucía” and the project Smart EcoMountains “Thematic Center on Mountain Ecosystem & Remote sensing, Deep learning-AI e-Services University of Granada-Sierra Nevada” (LIFEWATCH-2019-10-UGR-4), which has been co-funded by the Ministry of Science and Innovation through the FEDER funds from the Spanish Pluriregional Operational Program 2014-2020 (POPE), LifeWatch-ERIC action line. The project has also been co-financed by the Provincial Council of Granada".

The personnel involved in the project:

Regino Zamora Rodríguez

Sampling Methods

1) The aims of this monitoring methodology are: to detect possible changes in the distribution and abundance of the benthic communities, modifications in the phenology of particular species, changes in the distribution in altitude of the species considered stenothermal of cold water, and the possible colonisation of higher reaches by more tolerant species at high temperatures (euritherms). A methodology compatible with the Water Framework Directive is implemented. The samplings are made in 23 localities distributed in 8 rivers of the Sierra Nevada, where aquatic macroinvertebrates are sampled by an evaluation protocol. This method consists of selecting 100 m of a stretch of river where the most frequent habitats are represented (hard substrates, plant detritus, banks with vegetation, submerged macrophytes, fine sediments). The covering (%) of the habitat types determines the number of samples (from a total of 20) that correspond to each habitat. At each sampling point, the samples are taken with a hand net square in section (0.25 m x 0.5 m), using the hands and feet to stir the substrate situated at 0.5 m from the mouth of the net. Once the samples are collected, the contents are fixed in 96% ethanol. These samples are determined up to the family level in order to apply the biological quality index IBMWP “Iberian Biomonitoring Working Party”. In this 100 m stream reach, the riparian vegetation is beaten with an entomological net looking for adult stoneflies and caddisflies, which are later identified to the species level. For the monitoring of the physico-chemical parameters and the flow in the rivers of the Sierra Nevada, data are taken in situ in the 23 sampling points with multiparametric probes: temperature, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, and pH. At the same time, water samples are collected and analysed in the laboratory using a multifunction photometer that measures: ammonium, nitrates, nitrites, total chloride, and phosphates. 2) Samplings in the Poqueira river were carried out monthly from January 2022 to January 2023. In each sampling campaign, physical parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, and discharge, were recorded in situ, and one litre of water was collected and cold preserved in order to determine some chemical parameters in the laboratory. Temperature was recorded hourly with the aid of a submerged thermometer datalogger (HOBO Water Temp Pro, 0.001 C accuracy). Macroinvertebrates were collected using a 250 micrometre mesh size kick net, and they were preserved with ethanol (70%). In the laboratory, samples were sieved with a 150 micrometre mesh size sieves. Adults were collected with an entomological net from the riparian vegetation, sampling a distance of approximately 100 m in each shore. They were preserved in 70% ethanol and brought to the laboratory for further identification. Regarding the bibliographical data compilation, all data were extracted from the bibliographic database compiled by each of the experts throughout their research career, who have collected all the information that has been published on species present in the Sierra Nevada over the years.

Study Extent 1) Within the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory the samplings are made during spring and autumn in 23 sampling points distributed in 8 different rivers of Sierra Nevada (Alhorí, Andarax, Bayárcal, Dílar, Genil, Monachil, Poqueira, and Trevélez rivers) with an altitudinal range from 950 to 2,600 m a.s.l. 2) Within the Smart EcoMountains project, an intensive survey was carried out in the Poqueira river at three different altitudes (approximately 2,500-2,000-1,500 m a.s.l.) representing different conditions: a high mountain reach without direct anthropogenic impacts, a medium mountain reach with riparian forest and few anthropogenic disturbances, and a reach below a mountain village with particular alterations in the water quality. Regarding the bibliographical data compilation, data were included in the dataset if the stream or river reach where they came from was within the limit of 800 m a.s.l. in the Sierra Nevada mountain system.
Quality Control A) All data have been revised by experts before their introduction in the dataset. B) Digitalisation: data from the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory monitoring methodologies is digitalised through data entry web forms, which includes several validation rules. C) Storage: all data is stored in Linaria (https://linaria.obsnev.es/), the institutional data repository of the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory. Linaria is a normalised database focused on ecology and biodiversity related-data and it is developed in a PostgreSQL/PostGIS relational database management system (RDBMS). D) Taxonomic validation: scientific names were checked with the checklist of the arthropod fauna of the Sierra Nevada mountain range (Tinaut et al., 2022). In addition, the scientific names of Trichoptera and Coleoptera were reviewed by experts. E) Locations validation: verbatim coordinates were converted from original formats (MGRS, UTM, sexagesimal degrees, etc.) to decimal degrees with the GBIF.ES coordinate converter tool (https://www.gbif.es/en/datos-biodiversidad/participa-en-gbif-es/herramientas-de-publicacion/). Sampling locations were checked with the study area and with spatial data of rivers (IGN and REDIAM). The “waterBody” Darwin Core element was completed with the names given by these official sources. F) Standardisation: the standardisation to Darwin Core was done according to the practices recommended by the TDWG guidelines (https://dwc.tdwg.org/terms/).

Method step description:

  1. A) All data is stored in Linaria (https://linaria.obsnev.es/), the institutional data repository of the Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory. This dataset put together useful and relevant information regarding the rivers of the Sierra Nevada from different sources. B) The dataset was standardised to the Darwin Core structure (Wieczorek et al., 2012) as sampling event data. It contains, specifically: 1,718 events, 15,347 occurrences, and 10,173 records of associated measurements (23 variables). The Darwin Core elements included in the Event Core are: eventID, modified, language, institutionCode, ownerInstitutionCode, datasetName, license, eventDate, year, month, day, continent, country, countryCode, waterBody, locality, locationRemarks, minimumElevationInMeters, maximumElevationInMeters, verbatimCoordinates, verbatimLatitude, verbatimLongitude, verbatimCoordinateSystem, decimalLatitude, decimalLongitude, coordinateUncertaintyInmeters, geodeticDatum, samplingProtocol, sampleSizeValue, sampleSizeUnit, samplingEffort, eventRemarks. For the Occurrence Extension are: occurrenceID, catalogNumber, collectionCode, eventID, eventDate, recordedBy, recordedByID, associatedReferences, organismRemarks, taxonRemarks, organismQuantity, organismQuantityType, lifeStage, sex, basisOfRecord, scientificName, taxonRank, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, subfamily, genus, subgenus, specificEpithet, infraSpecificEpithet, scientificNameAuthorship. For the Measurement or Fact Extension table, the Darwin Core elements included are: measurementID, eventID, measurementType, measurementValue, measurementUnit. C) The resulting dataset was published through the Integrated Publishing Toolkit of the Spanish node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) (http://ipt.gbif.es).

Bibliographic Citations

  1. Alba-Tercedor, J. & Jiménez Millán, F. 1978. Larvas de Efemerópteros de las estribaciones de Sierra Nevada. Factores que intervienen en su distribución. Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 2: 91-103.
  2. Alba-Tercedor, J. 1979. Larvas de Plecópteros de las estribaciones de Sierra Nevada (Granada). Factores que intervienen en su distribución. Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 3: 193-198.
  3. Aubert, J. 1952. Plécoptères récoltés par Mr. F. Schmid en Espagne. Eos, 28: 249-270.
  4. Aubert, J. 1954. Quelques Nemouridae espagnols nouveaux. Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gesellschaft, 27: 115-123.
  5. Aubert, J. 1956. Contribution à l`étude des Plécoptères d`Espagne. Mémoires de la Société vaudoise des Sciences naturelles, 11(5): 209-276.
  6. Aubert, J. 1962. Quelques Leuctra nouvelles pour l`Europe (Plécoptères, Leuctridae). Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gesellschaft, 35: 155-169.
  7. Aubert, J. 1963. Les Plécoptères de la Péninsule Iberique. Eos, 39: 23-107.
  8. Berge Henegouwen, A.L. Van & Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. 1992. Hydrochus nooreinus, a new species from Spain (Coleoptera, Hydrochidae). Storkia, 1: 26-28.
  9. Fajardo, M.C. 2014. Monitoring of Biological Communities. Pp.: 42-43. In: Aspizua, R.; Barea-Azcón, J.M.; Bonet, F.J.; Pérez-Luque, A.J. & Zamora, R. (coords.). Sierra Nevada Global-Change Observatory: Monitoring Methodologies. Consejería de Medio Ambiente, Junta de Andalucía.
  10. Fajardo Merlo, M.C. 2021. Primeras citas de Leuctra cazorlana Aubert, 1962 y Leuctra geniculata (Stephens, 1836) (Plecoptera, Leuctridae) en el macizo de Sierra Nevada (España). Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 45(1-2): 119-121.
  11. Fochetti, R. & Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. 2002. Biochemical evidence of a species boundary between Isoperla nevada Aubert, 1952 and Isoperla grammatica (Poda, 1761) (Plecoptera, Perlodidae). Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 26(3-4): 131-135.
  12. González, M.A., Iglesias, J.C. y Cobo, F. 1989. Notas sobre los Tricópteros de Sierra Nevada. Comunicado en V Congreso Español de Limnología. (sin publicar).
  13. González, M.A.; Terra, L.S.W.; Gacía de Jalón, D. & Cobo, F. 1992. Lista faunística y bibliográfica de los Tricópteros (Trichoptera) de la Península Ibérica e Islas Baleares. Listas de la flora y fauna de las aguas continentales de la Península Ibérica. Publicación nº11-1992.
  14. Jáimez-Cuéllar, 2004. Caracterización físico-química, macroinvertebrados acuáticos y valoración del estado ecológico de dos cuencas mediterráneas de influencia nival (Ríos Guadalfeo y Adra), según los criterios de la Directiva Marco del Agua. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada, Granada. 226 pp., 87A.
  15. Jáimez Cuéllar, P.; Luzón Ortega, J.; Palomino Morales, J.; Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. & López-Rodriguez, M.J. 2010. Los plecópteros como bioindicadores para la detección del cambio global en Sierra Nevada: informe final. Consultoría y asistencia técnica para el estudio de la cantidad y calidad de aguas de ríos y lagunas del espacio natural de Sierra Nevada. (EXPEDIENTE NET965121). Hydraena S.L.L. y Universidad de Granada. Granada.
  16. López Rodríguez, M.J. 2008. Life history, nymphal feeding and secondary production of Ephemeroptera and Plecoptera from Southern Iberian Peninsula. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada. Granada. 248 pp.
  17. Luzón-Ortega, J.M.; López-Rodríguez, M.J. & Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. 2013. Contribution to the knowledge of the stoneflies from Spain (Insecta, Plecoptera). Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 37(3-4): 225-275.
  18. Madrid Vinuesa, F. 1990. Factores físico-químicos y comunidades de macroinvertebrados de la cabecera del río Genil (Sierra Nevada) aguas arriba de Granada. Estudio de la calidad biológica de las aguas. Memoria de Licenciatura. Universidad de Granada. Granada. 198 pp.
  19. Navás, L. 1901. Una excursión científica a la Sierra Nevada. Butlletí de la Institució Catalana d'Història Natural, 1: 100-105.
  20. Sáinz-Bariáin, 2014. Diversidad, estrategias vitales y filogeografía de especies sensibles al cambio climático: Tricópteros en el Parque Nacional de Sierra Nevad. Tesis doctoral. Universidad de Granada, 2014.
  21. Sáinz-Cantero, C.E.; Zamora-Muñoz, C. & Alba-Tercedor, J. 1988. Coleópteros acuáticos del Río Monachil (Sierra Navada, Granada). Elytron, 2: 97-106.
  22. Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. 1989. Coleópteros acuáticos de Sierra Nevada. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada. Granada. 237 pp. + apéndices.
  23. Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. & Alba-Tercedor, J. 1989. Hydraena (Haenydra) tatii sp.n. from Southern Spain (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae). Aquatic Insects, 11 (2): 111-114.
  24. Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. & Alba-Tercedor, J. 1991a. Los Adephaga acuáticos de Sierra Nevada (Granada, España) (Coleoptera: Haliplidae, Gyrinidae, Dytiscidae). Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 15: 91-109.
  25. Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. & Alba-Tercedor, J. 1991b. Los Polyphaga acuáticos de Sierra Nevada (Granada, España) (Coleoptera: Hydraenidae, Hydrophilidae, Elmidae, Dryopidae). Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 15: 171-198.
  26. Sánchez Ortega, A. 1986. Taxonomía, ecología y ciclos de vida de los Plecópteros de Sierra Nevada. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada. Granada. 362 pp. + apéndices.
  27. Sánchez-Ortega, A. & Alba-Tercedor, J. 1988. Description and life cycle of Leuctra iliberis sp. n. from Southern Spain (Plecoptera, Leuctridae). Aquatic Insects, 10(2): 117-123.
  28. Sánchez-Ortega, A.; Alba-Tercedor, J. & Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. [2002] 2003. Lista faunística y bibliográfica de los Plecópteros de la Península Ibérica e Islas Baleares. Nº 16. Publicaciones de la Asociación española de Limnología. Editores de la serie: J. García Avilés y E. Rico. Madrid. 198 pp.
  29. Sanz, A.; Trenzado, C.; López-Rodríguez, M.J.; Furné, M. & Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. 2010. Study of the antioxidant defence in four species of Perloidea (Insecta, Plecoptera). Zoological Science, 27(12): 952-958.
  30. Sartori, M.; Membiela, P.; Ravizza, C.; Sánchez-Ortega, A. & Zwick, P. 1990. Liste des types déposés au Musée de zoologie, Lausanne. 1. Plecoptera (Insecta). Bulletin de la Société Vaudoise des Sciences Naturelles, 80(2): 165-190.
  31. Schoenemund, E. 1930. Beitrag zur kenntnis der Ephemeropteren und Plecopteren-fauna Spaniens. Zoologischer Anzeiger, 90: 62-63.
  32. Tierno de Figueroa, J. M.; Sánchez-Ortega, A. & Picazo-Muñoz, J. 1994. Sobre la distribución espacial y temporal de Isoperla nevada Aubert, 1952 (Insecta: Plecoptera). Zoologica Baetica, 5: 107-112.
  33. Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. 1998. Biología imaginal de los Plecópteros (Insecta, Plecoptera) de Sierra Nevada (Granada, España). Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada. Granada. 312 pp.
  34. Tierno de Figueroa, J. M.; Palomino‐Morales, J. A. & Luzón‐Ortega, J. M. 2000. Spatial distribution on river banks of Isoperla nevada (Plecoptera, Perlodidae), Chloroperla nevada (Plecoptera, Chloroperlidae) and Sericostoma cf. vittatum (Trichoptera, Sericostomatidae). Italian Journal of Zoology, 67(4), 355-358.
  35. Tierno de Figueroa, J.M. & Sáinz-Cantero, C.E. 2008. First record of Taeniopteryx hubaulti Aubert, 1946 (Plecoptera, Taeniopterygidae) in Southern Iberian Peninsula. Boletín de la Asociación española de Entomología, 32(1-2): 193-194.
  36. Tierno de Figueroa, J.M.; Martinez, J.; Martín, L. & González, M. 2018. Contribución al conocimiento faunístico de los Plecópteros (Insecta, Plecoptera) de la península ibérica (Andorra, España y Portugal). Boletín de la Sociedad Aragonesa de Entomología, 62:155-162.
  37. Tierno de Figueroa, J.M.; López-Rodríguez, M.J. & Villar-Argaiz, M. 2019. Spatial and seasonal variability in the trophic role of aquatic insects: An assessment of functional feeding group applicability. Freshwater Biology, 64:954–966. https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.13277
  38. Tinaut, A.; Sandoval Cortés, P.J.; Aguayo Becerra, D.; Ruano Díaz, F. & Tierno de Figueroa J.M. 2022. Checklist of the arthropod fauna of the Sierra Nevada Mountain range (Almería and Granada, Spain). v2.7. Dept. of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Granada. Dataset/Checklist. https://doi.org/10.15470/nt5nsx
  39. Vinçon, G. & Sánchez-Ortega, A. 2002. The genus Capnioneura in the Iberian Peninsula and the Pyrenees with the description of C. narcea sp. n. (Plecoptera, Capniidae). Nouvelle Revue d’Entomologie, 19(1): 73-81.
  40. Wieczorek, J., Bloom, D., Guralnick, R., Blum, S., Döring, M., Giovanni, R., Robertson, T., & Vieglais, D. (2012). Darwin core: An evolving community-developed biodiversity data standard. PLoS ONE, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029715
  41. Zamora-Muñoz, C. 1992. Macroinvertebrados acuáticos, caracterización y calidad de las aguas de los cauces de la cuenca alta del río Genil. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de Granada, Granada. 364 pp.
  42. Zamora-Muñoz & Alba-Tercedor, 1992. Caracterización y calidad de las aguas del río Monachil (Sierra Nevada, Granada). Factores físico-químicos y comunidades de macroinvertebrados acuáticos. Agencia del Medio Ambiente. Ed. Anel, Granada. 171 pp.
  43. Zwick, P. 1967. Revision der gattung Chloroperla Newman (Plecoptera). Mitteilungen der Schweizerischen Entomologischen Gesellschaft, 40: 1-26.

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers 10.15470/wqbmkz
d06b3c45-0d91-46e8-9732-a3ebecd659f7
https://ipt.gbif.es/resource?r=sn_rivers